Jump in and get muddy. Give back and get set. Scouts ignore the butterflies and go for it, and soon so will you.

Who are scouts?

Scouts are a go-getting group of young people aged
10 ½ to 14 who:

  • Master new skills and try new things
  • Make new friends
  • Have fun and go on adventures, at home and abroad
  • Explore the world around them
  • Help others and make a difference, in their own communities and beyond

Week in and week out, they gather in groups called Scout Troops to conquer the small task of changing the world.

What do Scouts get up to?

Discovering the world

Being a Scout is all about discovering the world on your own terms and making the most of what you have, wherever and whoever you are.

Alongside your new friends, you’ll master the skills that will help you weather the storms of life, and try things you’d never get the chance to do at home or at school – working with trained volunteers to achieve whatever you set your mind to.

Starting small, thinking big

Scouts start small but think big. They stand up for what they believe in and make a difference on their doorstops, confident in the knowledge that their daily actions add up.

In a society that can often feel increasingly isolated and inward facing, Scouts build bridges and break barriers.

Throughout history, they’ve played all sorts of useful roles in society, and this legacy continues today.

Listening in, lending a hand

Scouts seek out the answers to the big questions, and to the smaller questions that don’t seem to matter but really should. Most importantly, they say yes more often than they say no – whether they’re taking part in their first ever camp away from home, or writing their first line of code, or accepting the last of the toasted marshmallows.

Sound like fun? That’s because it is. All that’s missing is you.

Awards

Challenge Awards

Challenge Awards are all about stepping outside your comfort zone. Try out something you wouldn’t normally be interested in. Take the lead on something that scares you. Along the way, you’ll unlock hidden talents and stand tall.

Further information about awards for the Scout section can be found here.

Activity Badges

Master something you love, or try something shiny and new. If it spurs you on or stirs your interest, we’ve probably got a badge for it.

Further information about Scout activity badges can be found here.

60

Activity badges

9

Challenge Badges

18

Staged Badges

What does a Scout Troop look like?

Each Scout Troop is made up of young people aged 10½  to 14, led by trained adult volunteers who are on hand to share their skills and keep everyone safe. Traditionally, Scout leaders were nicknamed ‘Skip’ – an abbreviation of ‘Skipper’, which is a name given to a ship’s captain. In some Troops this name is still used, but these days it’s more common for Scout leaders to just use their real names.

Scouts are probably the most well-known members of the global Scout family.

Closer to home, they’re also part of their wider local Scout Group, alongside Beavers (aged 6-8) and Cubs (aged 8 to 10 1/2). When they’re older, they can also join Explorers (for young people aged 14 to 18) and Scout Network (for young people aged 18-25).

Joining Scouts

Interested in joining? Get in touch with your local leader using our finder tool. They’ll tell you more about where and when the group meets.

Scouts is open to all, and adjustments can always be made locally to make sure everyone can join in the fun. If you have any questions about accessibility, it’s best to chat with your local leader as soon as possible. By being upfront about additional needs from the start, parents/carers can work in partnership with local leaders to make sure their young person has the best experience possible.

Is there a waiting list?
Lots of young people are itching to join Scouts, so you might need to wait for a space to become available.

If your local Troop has a waiting list, parents and other adults might be able to solve the problem. We don’t just need swashbuckling adventurers to lead expeditions. We also need listeners, tidy-uppers and tea-makers, for as little or as much time as they can spare. If your parents or carers are curious about giving it a go but don’t want to overcommit, why not ask them to complete our four-week volunteering challenge? Every hour counts, and everyone is welcome.
What should I wear?
Once you’ve had time to settle in, you’ll get your own uniform to wear during meetings and on trips away.

Scouts usually wear a green shirt or blouse with their badges sewn on, which they pair with their Troop or Group scarf. They might wear blue uniform trousers or a skirt, or they might save their uniform bottoms for special occasions like awards ceremonies and public events – choosing to wear something more casual with their shirt during the week. Uniform can either be bought from our online shop - Scout Store - or from a local supplier. If you’re not sure where to start, adult volunteers can give you more information about what to buy and where to buy it.
How much does it cost?
The cost of going to Scouts will depend on how your local Troop does things. Usually, a basic fee covering the cost of the hire and upkeep of the place where you meet will be collected weekly, monthly, termly or annually. Trips, camps and activities that take place away from the usual meeting place are usually charged separately.

Scouts is designed to be an affordable way to learn lots of new skills through a single membership. Nobody should feel excluded because of money worries. If they’re concerned about costs, adults should speak to their local leader in confidence, to see what they can do to help. In most cases, support is available to make sure nobody misses out. You can find out more about our grants here.

Moving on to Explorers

Eventually, it’ll be time embrace your next big adventure.

Find out about Explorers >

Ready to get involved or just want to know a little bit more?

Then get in touch with your local group.